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MyLife, MyRamblings, Tech, JobHunting

by Maria on 20 Oct 2014 - 06:56  

This is a longish rambling essay, I mean a super interesting essay, explaining why I haven't posted in so long (I've been very busy!), what I've been up to (talking to people, ye gads!), and some advice for job hunting, especially if you aren't currently worried about employment (cause job hunting sucks and you should worry, er I mean, prepare before you're out there!).

I want to tell you a story. A few years ago, I found myself pregnant fairly soon after receiving word that I would be losing my job. The only reason I mention that I was pregnant is because that meant I really couldn't spend much time job hunting before I lost my job, even though I had quite a few months warning. I would be getting decent severance, so I wasn't too panicked. Yes, the economy still sucked, but it was starting to recover, and tech jobs were the first returning. Other people staying in Seattle from my lab had managed to find new employment before my boss moved, which I also took as a good sign. The last time I had been out looking for work was during the dot com bust, and while it had taken a few months, I had more experience this time. So, a few months after my boy was born, my job went away and I received a rude awakening. The job market had changed.

I've already done a rant about tech interviews, so I won't rant about that again. And of course, the job market had changed in quite a few ways in 12 years, but one of the biggest lessons I learned was the importance of networking in today's market, and how when you find yourself unemployed, that is not the ideal time to start networking. We have all heard about how important networking is, but what does that mean? Well, I think the bottom line is, it means getting to know lots of people that are willing to recommend you for a job. Yes, someone you meet once or twice at a networking event may tell you that their company is looking for someone that has your skills, and they may even get your resume in front of the hiring manager, which is definitely a step up from applying through a website, don't get me wrong, but it is not your most likely route to a job. What you really want is for someone who knows you, your work ethic, your personality, and your skills and also know the hiring manager pretty well, to recommend you. Someone you met at a networking event a few times, just can't do that. So, the way to effectively network is to get to know as many people as well as possible. Not just any people, but people that understand the skills needed to do your job, iow people doing your job or a pretty similar one. You need to get to know them as well as possible by talking shop, and a lot of it, and not just about your favorite movie or whatever. You know you have probably reached that with someone when you would be completely comfortable recommending them for a job, so yeah, this takes a while, and if you can do joint projects, all the better. And then, when you are looking for a job, you should personally hit up every one of those connections, and ask them if they have heard of any job openings you may be interested in. And remind them you are looking on a regular basis, but somehow strike that balance of not being a pest, but keeping your name in their thoughts. I'm afraid I don't have much advice on that last one, and I suspect it depends on the person and the method as much as anything.

So now I can finish my story. The reason I had lost my job was because my boss had moved to NYC, and I was unable to move to NYC. After months of hitting total dead-ends looking for work, my old work called me back in to take down some servers that my former boss had left running. Someone new was taking over his old space, so all of his old stuff needed to be taken care of. I went in and dealt with everything, and started to walk out the door. And then I stopped and went back, because I thought, well I should probably introduce myself to the new person and let her know who I was so she could contact me if she found more stuff or had questions about anything. When I went in and introduced myself, she started asking me about what I had done for Mike, my old boss, and it turned out she was in the same boat Mike was, she had moved across the country and left her programmer behind. Neuroscience research with primates is a small field, so of course, she knew Mike, and so Mike's recommendation was valuable, and skills needed for both jobs greatly overlapped. So, when I finally found employment, it was a combination of serendipity and because of someone I knew well. Yeah, n of 1, I know, but, heh, the internet.

So, when I looked back on my 12 years of being a sysadmin and a software dev, I realized that I could pretty much count on one hand the number of other software developers I knew in the Seattle area. So, if I didn't know very many people who could recommend me, and I suck at interviews, it is no wonder I had such a hard time finding a job in the tech market! Why did I know so few other developers? This was for many reasons, but the main one was that I was in academia in a fairly secure job the whole time, and wasn't really thinking enough about life after my current gig. My ways of improving myself had always been books, mailing lists, and classes, which doesn't get you out in the community much. Plus, I had been working as both a sysadmin and a developer, but quite frankly the sysadmin required much more constant learning and tended to hog my learning time, because it involved so many different technologies and programs. I decided during my period of unemployment I wanted to focus on software development, and clearly, if I was going to continue to be a coder and be able to deal with any future unemployment or career moves, I was going to have to change how and what I was learning drastically. And so, the introvert starts the slow task of reaching out.

I started going to various meetups, and other local meetings of coders and learning more about how to become a better developer, figuring it would be good to kill two birds with one stone. And, while it has never been clear to me why I would want to kill two birds with stones, it was abundantly clear why I needed to both network and become a better developer. Since I was a self-taught developer, who had spent all my time in academia, I knew there were some holes in my skills and knowledge. In the meantime, I was really loving my new work at the University, but I was a little worried, because I was once again working by myself in a science lab with a bunch of primarily science researchers who knew a little about coding. One day at an event I was talking to people about becoming a better programmer. They were emphasizing pair coding, code reviews, working in a team, etc. and so I asked how I could improve when I worked by myself. One of the developers I was talking to told me that he didn't think anyone could become a great programmer working by themselves. Not the answer I was looking for.

Next post: How I responded

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